Tool of choice

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  1. #11
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    Ian
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    I'm no expert but FWIW I finish with a skew used sideways as a scraper, freshly sharpened and very, very lightly.

    When I used a mandrel I used to get harmonic vibrations quite often but recently I've taken to just putting bushings between centres and that problem has gone away.


     
     
  2. #12
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    I use a homemade tool. Nothing wrong with the roughing gouge but from your 3 tools mentioned I prefer the skew. As already mentioned I would put it down to technique, tool sharpness & lathe speed. I turn on max revs & sand at approx 900 rpm.
    Slow light cuts, give your tool time to cut so it’s not plucking the timber out. You shouldn’t get much if any tear out using a skew. Stick some cheap timber in the lathe & practice different techniques, there’s nothing to spoil as you haven’t drilled & glued the tube in the blank. Once you get better at it try a piece of pine. If you can turn it without any tear out you can very nearly turn any timber. Practice, practice & more practice.
    If it looks right it usually is! My namesake
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  3. #13
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    I might be missing the point here but torn grain at the ends sounds a little more like a milling / sanding problem than tooling to me?
    I can't decide whether to be a good example, or a horrible warning!

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/worke...06068033043974

     
     
  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Penpal View Post
    Not so my friend BOB have a good long look at the last pen I posted two chisels,one a bowl gouge,not roughing and a skew on the flat,minor finishing then with 1200 grit paper I cut into strips 3/4 inch wide. This followed by one coat of CA.

    Peter.
    Sorry Peter but we'll have to agree to disagree on this one.

    I didn't say you couldn't use a bowl gouge, of course you can, I could but then both of us are experienced, in my case I've been spinning wood on and off since I was 12 and I'm now 69. However the advice given is for a newbie and therefore should imo be different in as much it should be the best practice and easiest for the job in hand. I'm sure you in the past did the same as me and made tools from old files and chisels etc. which most people frown on these days.

    A bowl gouge has as you know got deep flutes for a reason, that's why it's designed and sold for faceplate turning.
    A scraper works well and as I said useful in the hands of experienced turners but... it's very easy indeed, especially for a beginner to get a dig in and unless REALLY sharp and using light cuts they will inevitably tear the grain on spindle turning as opposed to a gouge or skew which polishes the wood on the bevel.

    So that in mind I firmly believe my advice is absolutely correct and in the best interests of educating someone just starting out. Remember we have another member on here who finds it impossible to turn wood and I would hate the OP to find himself disillusioned because he's not practicing best techniques.

    No disrespect whatsoever intended Peter, we've corresponded often enough over the years for you hopefully to believe I wouldn't want to do that.

    Just as an aside I turned a pen today for the sales manager who gave me a very good discount off a new motorhome, very quick and simple just a piece of english oak so I took some pics. Turned to round with a roughing gouge then finished with a skew so pic before sanding with 400 & 600g then 2 coats of friction polish and one micro wax as he wanted an open grain. No torn edges and took me 10 minutes. BUT... a newbie would find that challenging!

    Photos just from my 'phone so a bit naff.

    Pic 1. straight from a skew chisel
    pic 2. sanded to 600g
    pic 3. 2 coats of friction polish
    pic 4 & 5 finished pen
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    Bob

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better. (Samuel Beckett)

     
     
  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Lawton View Post
    I might be missing the point here but torn grain at the ends sounds a little more like a milling / sanding problem than tooling to me?
    Would help I think to get some photos Neil so we're singing from the same song sheet.
    Bob

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better. (Samuel Beckett)

     
     

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