Tool of choice

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  1. #1
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    Tool of choice

    Hi there,
    Ive been having a few issues with torn grain and wondering if it's potentially down to tool choice. The first pen I made I used only a roughing gouge and the results were very good. I have mde a few more pens since and started with a skew then moved on to a spindle gouge, and on each of these there has been torn grain at the end of the tube. Im sanding to 400 grit but obviously this doesnt get rid of the torn grain. Today I made another slimline with a walnut blank and it turned out pretty well apart from again some torn grain at the end of the tube. So my question is, do people find that just using a roughing gouge gives better results than using other tools?


     
     
  2. #2
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    No best use of a bowl gouge and scraper laid on the flat,because I am a collector I also use twenty other chisels sometimes.

    Peter.
    Nil Desperandum

     
     
  3. #3
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    My preference is a 1/2" shew.

    COOPER 01/08/1998-31/01/2012

     
     
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    I wouldn't personally use a scraper and bowl gouge while "spindle turning" a pen as Peter suggests, I think he's probably misunderstood your problem as he is very experienced..
    I wouldn't advise a scraper on wood while spindle turning although many do so and it is possible to produce shavings and a reasonable finish it's also much more likely to tear the grain especially for a novice. I have used one and a tct tipped scraper on ebony and some very hard lignum vitae with good result and often on acrylic blanks.

    I think it's just a matter of practice and techique so keep at it, maybe best to just spend some time actually turning wood to get a feel of the tools rather than actually making something. Practicing just shaping the wood, try light and heavy cuts and you'll soon get a feel for what you're doing and what you shouldn't do which is even more important.

    Very important is that you're tools are razor sharp so spending time on achieving that is more than worthwhile and you'll get quicker as you go. What is you're sharpening set up?

    I mostly use a roughing gouge for all or all but the final touch on a pen but alsi a skew chisel which gives a polished finish straight from the tool needing just a light touch of abrasive.
    Bob

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better. (Samuel Beckett)

     
     
  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lons View Post
    I wouldn't personally use a scraper and bowl gouge while "spindle turning" a pen as Peter suggests, I think he's probably misunderstood your problem as he is very experienced..
    I wouldn't advise a scraper on wood while spindle turning although many do so and it is possible to produce shavings and a reasonable finish it's also much more likely to tear the grain especially for a novice. I have used one and a tct tipped scraper on ebony and some very hard lignum vitae with good result and often on acrylic blanks.

    I think it's just a matter of practice and techique so keep at it, maybe best to just spend some time actually turning wood to get a feel of the tools rather than actually making something. Practicing just shaping the wood, try light and heavy cuts and you'll soon get a feel for what you're doing and what you shouldn't do which is even more important.

    Very important is that you're tools are razor sharp so spending time on achieving that is more than worthwhile and you'll get quicker as you go. What is you're sharpening set up?

    I mostly use a roughing gouge for all or all but the final touch on a pen but alsi a skew chisel which gives a polished finish straight from the tool needing just a light touch of abrasive.
    Not so my friend BOB have a good long look at the last pen I posted two chisels,one a bowl gouge,not roughing and a skew on the flat,minor finishing then with 1200 grit paper I cut into strips 3/4 inch wide. This followed by one coat of CA.

    Peter.
    Nil Desperandum

     
     
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    Without actually watching what you are doing, I would suggest it's down to Sharpness and or Technique.

    you'll get 100's of answers of which tool, just keeping going and find your favourite.

    There are lots out there who only use carbide, many in the US, but that's probably what they learnt with.

    I use a continental 1/2 spindle gouge, I can use a skew if I want but find when I'm in production mode that's all I need.

    Practice practice practice. Keep at it and one day you'll get that eureka moment.
    I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I ever was

     
     
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    First of all I will start with the obvious tools sharp as already mentioned this is the biggest thing that a lot of people starting out need to address. Second is there are many tools that will be suitable to turn a pen it normally down to personal choice. With wood cut from the centre down to the ends so that you are cutting downhill.
    There is nothing wrong in a spindle roughing gouge I use mine for pens my favourite tool is the 1/2" skew for refining the shape either used planing or even scraping depending on the wood.
    I have made a pen using a 1 1/2" roughing gouge and a 1 1/4" skew just to show someone it can be done.
    "The only people who never fail are those that never try"


    DL Woodart

     
     
  8. #8
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    I just love it when you get insight into the secret life in sheds of the world...

    Kevin
    "Classy Turner" ~ Yeh right!!! How did that happen

    Why burn it when you can turn it ....

     
     
  9. #9
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    Are you getting torn grain on both ends of the tube? Just wondering about your technique.

     
     
  10. #10
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    Practice Practice Practice and then Practice a bit more. You will find which tool suits you best and eventually you will be able to get a good finish no matter what tool you use. The most important bit which has already been mentioned a few times KEEP EM SHARP !

     
     

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