Glueing tubes into blanks .... what am I missing?

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Thread: Glueing tubes into blanks .... what am I missing?

  1. #21
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    I always use gorilla glue and sand the tubes with 80 grit sandpaper (when the tubes are extruded they use an oil to allow the tube to move down the extrusion bit so you have to remove this excess oil and create keyways to hold the glue) , gorilla glue does like humidity to set, so I blow down the tubes to remove any dust and to dampen the inside. I apply the glue to the tube in a spiral and insert one end into the blank twisting it to spread the glue then the same end into the other end of the blank again twisting it to spread the glue around. Any excess glue I slice off with a Stanley knife, when its dry, and I always use a barrel trimmer (but I do sharpen mine with a file) . I don't have any tube slippage. Much also depends on your climatic conditions ie here when it is zero degrees I keep the glue in the house because it does not like the cold. Gorilla will fill any gap up to 1mm in my experience. When I turn I always turn at 3500 rpm from the outset this reduces the 'air' time created with the corners of the square blank (just as you would with a winged box).

    PG

    Enjoy Life you only get it once and there is no Apprenticeship

     
     
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  3. #22
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    Quickly flipping through all the possible that have been given one thing comes to mind when drilling the hole the tube does not need to be a tight fit in the blank as all you are doing is to rub of the adhesive therefore giving little to stick the two together. The tube should slid through the blank but not to the point of it moving about to much, like Flexi I measure each tube and find a bit to suit and don't rely on the said sizes by manufacturers.

    I use either epoxy resin glues or the polyurethane expanding type glues and found that I don't usually have any problems unless I do something stupid. Getting a catch can break a bond either as you have found or the blank just breaks up completely
    "The only people who never fail are those that never try"


    DL Woodart

     
     
  4. #23
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    As said, the most important part is to use the right size drill. If you need to use Polyurethane glue to fill the gap you’ve used too big a drill bit. Use Epoxy glue instead, it’s far better than Polyurethane in my opinion, has a much, much longer shelf life and is less messy. I used to glue all my archery points into the arrow tube with Araldite when I was into archery and never had a point come loose.

     
     
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  6. #24
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    Welcome Simon. You don’t say if you are drilling on the lathe or using a pillar drill. If you drill on the lathe. If drilling on the lathe check your headstock / tailstock alignment by doing the kiss test. This involves putting your headstock drive in the spindle, bringing the tailstock up close to the drive & locking it to the bed. Slowly wind the tailstock quill out until the point of tour tailstock drive is nearly touching the point of your headstock drive. Check both vertically & horizontally to see if the points are in line. If they aren’t then adjust the headstock to line them up. If your lathe has a swivel head then unclamped the head line the points up then reclamation the head. Recheck the alignment to see if the head has moved when reclamping.
    If you have a fixes head & the points don’t line up then loosen the bolts, line up the points then retighten the bolts, again recheck alignment. Also check your tailstock when unclamped to see how much side movement you have as thes can also have an effect. It tends to make the holes oversize even if using the right size drill. I know because I had this problem with one of my lathes which is now cured. The tubes were very slack in the holes & caused problems. It’s long winded but I hope it helps.
    If it looks right it usually is! My namesake
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  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dibbs View Post
    Try a 9.8mm bit or even 9.7. Holes usually come out a fraction oversized in my experience

    9.8 mm HSS Jobber Drill bit. | eBay
    9.7 mm HSS Jobber Drill bit. | eBay
    9.8 would be perfect but canít find locally, will look online. I think the hole size being too large was definitely part of my problem.

     
     
  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Mooney View Post
    Welcome Simon. You don’t say if you are drilling on the lathe or using a pillar drill. If you drill on the lathe. If drilling on the lathe check your headstock / tailstock alignment by doing the kiss test. This involves putting your headstock drive in the spindle, bringing the tailstock up close to the drive & locking it to the bed. Slowly wind the tailstock quill out until the point of tour tailstock drive is nearly touching the point of your headstock drive. Check both vertically & horizontally to see if the points are in line. If they aren’t then adjust the headstock to line them up. If your lathe has a swivel head then unclamped the head line the points up then reclamation the head. Recheck the alignment to see if the head has moved when reclamping.
    If you have a fixes head & the points don’t line up then loosen the bolts, line up the points then retighten the bolts, again recheck alignment. Also check your tailstock when unclamped to see how much side movement you have as thes can also have an effect. It tends to make the holes oversize even if using the right size drill. I know because I had this problem with one of my lathes which is now cured. The tubes were very slack in the holes & caused problems. It’s long winded but I hope it helps.
    Thanks Bill, didn’t think of that one. Did as you suggested but they were lined up beautifully as it happens.

     
     
  10. #27
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    Ok, an update and a huge thank you to everyone who added their collective knowledge to this as it REALLY helped me out.

    Problem was, I’m convinced, the hole being slightly bigger than it should be. I’ll look for the 9.7 or 9.8 mm drill bit for this particular pen set (as I like this kit). If I can’t find locally, Brisbane (disgustingly hot and humid but the gorilla glue should like that ), I’ll order from the link someone kindly gave me for eBay UK as I’ll be home in sunny Hertfordshire for Christmas.

    As an update though .... having blended the excellent advice you’ll all provided I’ve done a load more glue ups, on wood. Has 100% success rate with the tube staying firmly in place. Yay!!! Much more fun now :)

    Even managed, using epoxy, a couple of acrylics and tubes stayed out there as well. Managed to shatter one of those, but it was brittle and I’m still learning, but other one worked perfectly ..... well, turning wise, it ended up being too thin for that particular pen kit and I could see the tube through the acrylic which spoiled it. However, I much prefer wood so don’t expect to do too many acrylic.

    So, thank you everyone, this thread has really solved my issue and got me turning with so much less frustration

     
     
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  12. #28
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    Glad to here you’re getting on ok now Simon. Acrylics can be a pain to turn, I think we’ve all smashed one at some point!

     
     
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  14. #29
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    Hi

    In my limited experience I think that ambient conditions may effect the curing times of adhesives. Maybe a gentle application of heat to the blank could aid curing times.

    If this doesn't work then I am allergic to pain

    Please let us know how you get on.

    Cheers
    Frederick

     
     
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  16. #30
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    What a diatribe on making a pen in relation to your post Simon. It must be obvious that we all have had or will a steep learning curve with these aspects in making pens. I have found committing equipment to do repetitive tasks that give quick and accurate help in the process to be very cheap over the years when amortised over numbers of beaut results. In the last while I have given huge numbers of special equipment to a mens shed. I was at a Craft Show recently tootling along on my disability scooter,a voice from above high Sir Peter (a title given with a life membership of that mens shed). Initially when I was first in the rush and bustle of years in pens my wife observed how I would be dissapointed when I got to turning proper. I made my first lathe etc and yes I have loved creating things to make pens.One thing that always amuses is the price and quality of drills the unseen blessings of repeatability and just how cheap they work out to be. Constant measurement of them when you buy them will reveal subtle but real errors inn sizes that can also contribute to under and overs.

    Peter.
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