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  1. #1
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    Another question

    I have only used carbide tools for pen turning, but recently swapped an old mortiser for a box of rarely used lathe tools.
    What sharpening system do you use/recommend?
    I asked a neighbour who is doing a woodworking course at the local Tech what they used and he told me that the tutor only sharpens on a disc sander. I don't think that my tools would be up to snuff if I used that system.
    Any suggestions? or I can just stick with the carbide.
    Alan


     
     
  2. #2
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    Alan

    I use a combination of things to sharpen my tools.

    I have a bench grinder. In my case, it's a 6" high speed grinder with an 80 grit aluminum oxide wheel. I have a shop-made jig modeled on the Wolverine system to help shape gouges. The guru's say that you absolutely must use a large (8") wheel on a slow-speed grinder, but I don't agree. The difference between a 6" wheel and an 8" wheel is how hollow the grind will be - and that difference is rather small and not very important. The supposed advantage of using a slow speed grinder is that you don't remove as much metal so your tools last longer, but I think you can accomplish the same thing by learning to use a very light touch at the grinder. So as far as I'm concerned, an inexpensive high-speed grinder with 6" wheels works just fine, and its also convenient for other grinding tasks around the house.

    I also have a sanding wheel that mounts on my lathe. I made mine by mounting a commercial hook-and-loop disk on a block of wood with a threaded hole that matches the thread of my lathe spindle, but it is also possible to make one from a scrap of plywood or mdf. I use a fairly fine grade of sandpaper, and I don't replace them very often (so its actually much finer than the rated grit). A belt sander would also work. Like the grinder, the key is to use a light touch.

    And I have various stones - both conventional oil stones, and diamond honing plates. These are ideal for parting tools and skew chisels, and can also be used to quickly 'tune up' the edge of a gouge. I've never actually bought a stone - the oil stones I have I inherited from my Dad and Father-in-Law - so they are easily 60-70 years old. I use a lapping fluid on my diamond honing plates that I make by adding a few drops of dishwashing detergent to tap water.

    The point is that you can make sharpening into rocket science, or you can treat it as just another task that has to be done in the shop, and find quick, simple, and inexpensive workarounds.
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

    Louie

     
     
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  4. #3
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    The easiest sharpening system to use is the Sorby Proedge not cheap though

     
     
  5. #4
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    I use a bench grinder with a white wheel for my turning tools and the robert sorby attachment and a record power wet grinder(similar to the tormek) for my other woodworking tools
    "The only people who never fail are those that never try"


    DL Woodart

     
     
  6. #5
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    Sorry Proedge every time
    When all else fails read the instructions

     
     
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  8. #6
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    +one for the Pro edge.....I had a Tormek and sold it to buy the Pro edge...
    I only open my mouth...to change feet...
    www.turningmatters.co.uk

     
     
  9. #7
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    Pro edge for shaping & sharpening my lathe tools. For sharpening my woodwork tools I use Japanese water stones.
    If it looks right it usually is! My namesake
    BLIND VETERANS UKhttps://www.facebook.com/blindveteransuk?ref=ts&fref=ts
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  10. #8
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    Using carbide tools together with high speed steel tools,I use a diamond file for the carbide and a double ended bench high speed grinder for all others. Also my gouges I sharpen looking down on the process and holding the chisel during sharpening at right angles to the wheel,easy and you can see the results instantly,works for me.In other words I value all types of chisels and sharpen accordingly.A mate showed me how simple it was on the curved gouges when held at right angles,blows the theory of 8 inch wheels versus 6 inch wheels as the stone addresses the chisel flat.No I never use 6 inch wheels I believe they take too much metal when used normally.

    Peter.
    Nil Desperandum

     
     
  11. #9
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    Ok, here’s my bit of unwanted opinion, a dustbin for the carbides, and sharpen by hand. The obsession of the preservation of tools that are designed, by virtue of the fact that they have to be worn away by being sharpened, has always amused or confused me, learn to loose a little bit of metal and then sharpen according to your own style by hand.
    There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. (John Ruskin 1819-1900)

     
     
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  13. #10
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    Bench grinder or Tormek for me.

    COOPER 01/08/1998-31/01/2012

     
     

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