Minimal Equipment List for turning shafts

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  1. #1
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    Minimal Equipment List for turning shafts

    Hi Everyone,

    I'd like to start turning some small parts from wood; the parts are just wooden tubes similar to pen shafts. The maximum length will be 10cm and the interior diameter will always be the same.

    I'm putting together a minimal tools list and I was hoping you could check & advise on anything I've missed. I live in a flat so smaller is better; and I figure the parts are small anyway so I don't need big tools.


    - Lathe
    Seems like Axminister is the most recommended brand, but I'm wondering if I can get away with the cheapest one? Or the Charnwood W815P which seems to be in stock.
    There are also small metal lathes; I assume those work with wood too? For example; AXMINSTER MODEL ENGINEER SERIES C0. I'm not sure what the limitations and advantages are; I assume the more expensive models are more precise and have more torque? I would like to work with hard wood so if the cheap one limits that for example I would spend more. Precision is not so much of a factor; only the shaft hole diameter must be correct.

    - Chisels
    I think I can just get 2? A gouge and a flat one?

    - Drill
    This is another question; from my GCSE DT days I remember there was a drill part that can go on the right side of the lathe and I could drill that way... is that feasible with one of these mini lathes?
    I think I need just one diameter.

    - Sandpaper / Laquer
    Various Grits

    Apologies if these are really silly questions; I searched quite a bit but there's no real list I can find that shows the smallest number of tools you need to get started.

    Cheers,
    Rahil


     
     
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  3. #2
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    Hi,..... Yes it can be done on a budget, with minimal tools.
    The main difference between a metal lathe and a wood lathe is the tool post.... Metal lathes have fixed multi axis cutter heads, wood lathes just a tool rest, if you are just turning straight tubes with no shape then yes you could do this very well and quickly on a metal lathe but as you have noticed you'll be paying more for bits you don't really need.
    Personally I think a good wood lathe will suffice. Axminster used to rate there tools, hobby (a couple of hours a week) Trade( maybe one day a week) Professional ( almost constant use) you may need to consider this in your choices too... Also Axminster sell off their returns at discount so their can be the odd bargain to be had.
    Again Yes you can drill on the lathe with a drill chuck in your tail stock, a cheeper and less spacious option to a pillar drill, but again more load on your one machine.
    Good luck, I hope this helps
    I only open my mouth...to change feet...
    www.turningmatters.co.uk

     
     
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  5. #3
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    Damn.... Like yourself I also forgot...
    Work holding..... You will need some form of holding device. This could be a 3 / 4 jaw chuck or centers, a live center and dead center..... Probably if your going to drill on the lathe too it will have to be a chuck of some sort.
    A saw for cutting stock to length would also be a good call
    I only open my mouth...to change feet...
    www.turningmatters.co.uk

     
     
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    Hi Rahil,another woodturning lathe to consider is the Record Power DML250 mini lathe rrp 259.It is their smallest lathe and would probably suit your needs perfectly.Record also do a full range of accessories eg chuck,jaws etc.They are a long established company with an excellent reputation.I am on my second Record lathe and have never had any trouble.(touchwood!)They have stockists countrywide,I guess the nearest to you would be D&M Tools Twickenham.They have a good display of Record products and their staff are always very helpful and will point you in the right direction.Hope this helps,look forward to getting hooked on turning!
    Geoff.
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  9. #5
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    Hi again Rahil,my memory is buggered!If you go on the Record Power website you will find some good videos that will help you.
    Grumpier by the day.

     
     
  10. #6
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    Welcome to the forum, Rahil.
    A couple of comments.....
    If you are checking out lathes my advice would be to look at the variable speed ones, much better than belt changing.
    I switched from using sandpaper to Abranet sheets and havent used sandpaper on anything on the lathe since.
    Like Mark above I do my drilling on the lathe also.
    Alan

     
     
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    For Precision work on small parts I use an ER32 collet Chuck to hold the work. If the timber is not round, which is very often the case, I turn it between centres first to fit one of my collets. I have collet chucks for both my MW and wood lathe. If turning small cylinders it’s very much easier done on the metalwork lathe.

     
     
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    Hi
    I do most of my turning on a metal work lathe. For straight tubes its a doddle. I drill using the tail stock with the tube held in the chuck. All metal lathes come with a chuck as standard. But if you find you want to branch out later on into wood turning you may find the metal lathe unsuitable. I have both. A metal working lathe and a Axminster variable speed wood lathe.

     
     

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